UN climate change panel chairman: Yup, global warming policies are really about redistributing wealth.

Ottmar Edenhofer isn’t exactly a household name, but he’s a big deal in the world of global warming. The German economist is the co-chair of the UN’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, which produces a lot of the reports and data that continue to get people all, er, hot and bothered about the problem of global warming.

The Global Warming Policy Foundation — a group skeptical of the claims made about climate change — calls attention to this interview with Edenhofer where he basically admits that plans to address global warming are largely about redistributing global wealth:

The new thing about your proposal for a Global Deal is the stress on the importance of development policy for climate policy. Until now, many think of aid when they hear development policies.

That will change immediately if global emission rights are distributed. If this happens, on a per capita basis, then Africa will be the big winner, and huge amounts of money will flow there. This will have enormous implications for development policy. And it will raise the question if these countries can deal responsibly with so much money at all.

That does not sound anymore like the climate policy that we know.

Basically it’s a big mistake to discuss climate policy separately from the major themes of globalization.

Doesn’t get much clearer than that. If international bodies suddenly get the authority to distribute carbon emissions, than “huge amounts of money” will flow from the richer parts of the world to the poorer parts.

Beltway Confidentialglobal warmingUNUS

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