Tsunami waves hit northeastern Japan after quake

TOKYO — Tsunami waves of over 3 feet hit northeastern Japan on Tuesday after a magnitude-7.4 earthquake rocked the region, the same hit by a 2011 quake and tsunami that caused a nuclear meltdown at Fukushima power plant.

Waves of up to 4 feet hit Sendai port in northeastern Japan at 8:05 a.m., broadcaster NHK reported, citing the Meteorological Agency.

The quake prompted the agency to issue a tsunami warning in the prefectures of Miyagi and Fukushima for waves of up to 10 feet.

Authorities urged residents in the coastal areas of the region to move to higher ground.

Waves of up to 3 feet were recorded in the prefecture of Fukushima, one hour after the quake, the agency said.

Up to 2 feet of tsunamis were also observed in the prefectures of Ibaraki, Iwate and Chiba, it said.

In March 2011, a magnitude-9 quake and resulting tsunami struck the same region, claiming the lives of about 18,500 people and causing Japan’s worst nuclear accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station.

No abnormalities had been detected at the plant Tuesday, broadcaster NHK reported, citing the operator Tokyo Electric Power.

However, the quake brought a fuel cooling system to a halt at Reactor 3 at Fukushima Daini Nuclear Power Station, 6 miles south of the Daiichi plant, though there were no risks of radiation leak, regulators said. The plant’s reactors have been suspended.

The government has not otherwise received any reports of major damage from the region, Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga told a news conference.

The quake struck at 5:59 a.m. local time and was centered off Fukushima, at a depth of 15 { miles, the Meteorological Agency said, revising the depth from an earlier estimation of 6 miles.

The quake has also been revised up to magnitude 7.4, from a preliminary reading of 7.3, according to the agency.

The quake shook buildings in Tokyo, about 150 miles southwest of Fukushima.

Earthquake- and volcano-prone Japan sits at the convergence of four tectonic plates.

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

A San Francisco Unified School District program that gave would-be teachers extra training in the classroom has lost a key partner. <ins>(Kevin N. Hume/2019 S.F. Examiner)</ins>
USF ends partnership with SFUSD in teacher residency program

District launched training effort to improve low retention rates for new hires

The Rev. Norman Fong of the Chinatown Community Development Center joined San Francisco city leaders and community partners in a “Campaign for Solidarity” at Civic Center Plaza on Saturday, Apr 17, 2021. (CraigLee/Special to the S.F. Examiner)
City launches ‘Campaign for Solidarity’ to combat racial violence

Mayor London Breed, the city’s Human Rights Commission and community leaders launched… Continue reading

It’s time to break the code of silence and end the stigmatism against infertility, which is fairly common. <ins>(Shuttterstock)</ins>
Struggles with infertility are common

We all can support friends, ask legislators to mandate sppropriate insurance

Foxes, aka Louisa Rose Allen, says she taken back control of her music in recent years. <ins>(Courtesy Hollie Fernando)</ins>
Foxes back with ‘Friends in the Corner’

Pop star doing a lot ‘behind the scene’ since 2016

Former Stockton Mayor Michael Tubbs spoke to San Francisco’s new Guaranteed Income Advisory Group on April 16. (Courtesy SFGOV)
City launches task force to explore Universal Basic Income programs

San Francisco on Friday launched a guaranteed income task force that could… Continue reading

Most Read