Tsunami waves hit northeastern Japan after quake

TOKYO — Tsunami waves of over 3 feet hit northeastern Japan on Tuesday after a magnitude-7.4 earthquake rocked the region, the same hit by a 2011 quake and tsunami that caused a nuclear meltdown at Fukushima power plant.

Waves of up to 4 feet hit Sendai port in northeastern Japan at 8:05 a.m., broadcaster NHK reported, citing the Meteorological Agency.

The quake prompted the agency to issue a tsunami warning in the prefectures of Miyagi and Fukushima for waves of up to 10 feet.

Authorities urged residents in the coastal areas of the region to move to higher ground.

Waves of up to 3 feet were recorded in the prefecture of Fukushima, one hour after the quake, the agency said.

Up to 2 feet of tsunamis were also observed in the prefectures of Ibaraki, Iwate and Chiba, it said.

In March 2011, a magnitude-9 quake and resulting tsunami struck the same region, claiming the lives of about 18,500 people and causing Japan’s worst nuclear accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station.

No abnormalities had been detected at the plant Tuesday, broadcaster NHK reported, citing the operator Tokyo Electric Power.

However, the quake brought a fuel cooling system to a halt at Reactor 3 at Fukushima Daini Nuclear Power Station, 6 miles south of the Daiichi plant, though there were no risks of radiation leak, regulators said. The plant’s reactors have been suspended.

The government has not otherwise received any reports of major damage from the region, Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga told a news conference.

The quake struck at 5:59 a.m. local time and was centered off Fukushima, at a depth of 15 { miles, the Meteorological Agency said, revising the depth from an earlier estimation of 6 miles.

The quake has also been revised up to magnitude 7.4, from a preliminary reading of 7.3, according to the agency.

The quake shook buildings in Tokyo, about 150 miles southwest of Fukushima.

Earthquake- and volcano-prone Japan sits at the convergence of four tectonic plates.

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