The readout had a familiar ring

Sometimes when leaders meet, the White House burps forth a “readout” from the press office on what went down. It's rarely very informative. More often than you'd think, elected officials behind closed doors have discussions that are “frank” and “open,” but otherwise non-eventful.

But what to make of today's even more crypto-bland-than-usual readout of Vice President Biden's meeting with Republican Rep. Darrell Issa of California.

Issa is in line to become chairman of the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, and as such the leading interlocutor of the Obama administration in the next Congress.

A quick note from Biden's office:

 

The Vice President and Representative Issa met today to discuss Recovery Act oversight and opportunities to apply some of the lessons learned to other federal programs.  They identified some areas of agreement, including the need to enforce full compliance with reporting by recipients of Recovery Act funds, and to have follow-up conversations about other areas where they can work together.

 

And a quick note from the congressman's office:

The Vice President and Rep. Issa met today to discuss Recovery Act oversight and opportunities to apply some of the lessons learned to other federal programs.  They identified some areas of agreement, including the need to enforce full compliance with reporting by recipients of Recovery Act funds, and to have follow-up conversations about other areas where they can work together.

Which do you like better? Maybe the Obama administration and new House Republican majority are closer together on message than they appear.

 

 

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