The public still opposes a health care makeover

In recent weeks, we've seen the return of the idea that passage of the Democratic national health care program is inevitable. And indeed, Democrats can point to some signs of progress. But as far as the big picture is concerned, after a wall-to-wall, 24/7 push by the White House and Democratic leaders, the public remains opposed to a health care makeover.

Pollster.com's average of polls on the issue shows that 49.6 percent of those surveyed oppose a national health care makeover, versus 43.2 percent who support it. A graph of those results shows the trend lines moving farther apart, not closer.

Pollster.com's listing of polls shows 35 different public surveys on health care reform since September 1. In 23 of those polls, more people said they opposed the plan than supported it; 11 polls show more people supporting than opposing; and one was tied. Of those 35 polls, a dozen have been done since October 1. In eight of them, more people opposed the plan than supported it; three were in favor, and one was tied.

Even more recently, four of the last five public polls show more people opposing reform than supporting it. The new Washington Post/ABC poll, for example — touted as great news for reform because it shows support for a public option — shows 48 percent of respondents opposed to reform, and 45 percent in favor.

By the way, in that new Washington Post poll, two-thirds of respondents say health care reform would increase the federal budget deficit — a clear lack of faith in President Obama's promise that reform would not add “one dime” to the deficit.

The Post asked, “Just your best guess, do you think health care reform would increase the federal budget deficit, decrease it, or have no effect?” Ten percent say it would decrease the deficit, 18 percent say it would have no effect, and 68 percent say it would increase the deficit.

Of those who say it would increase the deficit, the pollsters asked an additional question: Would reform be worth it? Thirty-seven percent said it would not be worth it, and 31 percent said it would.
 

Beltway ConfidentialHealth care reformUS

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

Former Stockton Mayor Michael Tubbs spoke to San Francisco’s new Guaranteed Income Advisory Group on April 16. (Courtesy SFGOV)
City launches task force to explore Universal Basic Income programs

San Francisco on Friday launched a guaranteed income task force that could… Continue reading

Muni’s K-Ingleside line will return six months earlier than previously announced. <ins>(Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)</ins>
K-Ingleside train to return on May 15

Announcement comes on the heels of pressure from Supervisor Myrna Melgar

Demonstrators march from Mission High School towards the San Francisco Police station on Valencia Street. (Jordi Molina/ Special to the S.F. Examiner)
Vigil, march honors those killed by police

Deaths of Daunte Wright, Roger Allen and others prompt renewed calls for defunding

A Recology employee stands at the comapany’s recycling facility on Pier 96 in 2016. (Jessica Christian/2016 S.F. Examiner)
Nuru scandal: Feds charge second former Recology executive with bribery

A second former Recology executive is facing charges for allegedly bribing ex-Public… Continue reading

Skier Andy Padlo crosses a frozen Spicer Reservoir. (Courtesy photo)
Stormy weather tests skiers’ mettle on Dardanelle traverse

Overcoming challenges makes outings more rewarding

Most Read