The New York Times stages an intervention for Nancy Pelosi

The liberal editorial board of the venerable New York Times has a message for recently-defeated Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi who wants to continue on as minority leader  — take a hike, champ:

Ms. Pelosi announced on Friday that she would seek the post of House minority leader. That job is not a good match for her abilities in maneuvering legislation and trading votes, since Democrats will no longer be passing bills in the House. What they need is what Ms. Pelosi has been unable to provide: a clear and convincing voice to help Americans understand that Democratic policies are not bankrupting the country, advancing socialism or destroying freedom.

But bizarrely, even as the Times wisely encourages Pelosi to take a hike, it’s still drinking the liberal Kool-Aid:

If Ms. Pelosi had been a more persuasive communicator, she could have batted away the ludicrous caricature of her painted by Republicans across the country as some kind of fur-hatted commissar jamming her diktats down the public’s throat. Both Ms. Pelosi and Harry Reid, the Senate majority leader, are inside players who seem to visibly shrink on camera when defending their policies, rarely connecting with the skeptical independent voters who raged so loudly on Tuesday.

So again, America thinks Pelosi is a “fur-hatted commissar jamming her diktats down the public’s throat” because she’s an “unpersuasive communicator”? Come again? Tell me, oh wise oracles at the Times editorial board, what did the public think about the Democrats employing procedural shenanigans to, say, pass a trillion dollar health care bill in the face clear and overwhelming public opposition? Did that help her keep the House? Or was that just a communication problem?

Over at Hot Air, Ed Morrissy sums it up nicely:

But voters didn’t kick more than 60 Democrats out of the House because they missed their sales quotas.  They voted them out because Democrats promised moderation and fiscal prudence in 2006 and 2008 and then pushed a radical agenda and spent money wildly and to little effect.  Nancy Pelosi was the author of that deception, and if Democrats want to regain voter trust, it’s going to take something other than a new sales pitch with the same old leadership to do it.

Beltway ConfidentialeditorialNancy PelosiUS

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