The M Line for Convention & Visitors Bureau

Each week, The Examiner showcases an advertising campaign by a local company.

Client: San Francisco Convention & Visitors Bureau (SFCVB)

Job: A gay/lesbian travel campaign

Agency: The M Line, www.the-m-line.com.

Principals: Jef Loyola, president; Dina Berman, account director; Alan So, designer.

Other clients: San Francisco International Airport, San Francisco Arts Commission, Pyramid Breweries, Loan Performance, Nosal Partners, Visual Numerics, Berkeley Children’s Theater

Creative team: The campaign was developed with input from the SFCVB, the SFCVB LGBT Marketing Committee, the Golden Gate Business Association and research by Community Marketing Inc.

The plan: Media buy includes regional and national LGBT publications and Web sites, running in May and June 2007 and beyond.

The theme: “You’ll have so many new stories to tell, you’ll need proof. Find out what’s new in SF at onlyinsanfrancisco.com/gaytravel.”

The concept: The collection of images on the back of a digital camera tells the story of a visitor’s trip to San Francisco. The images show the diversity of San Francisco from some of the traditional gay neighborhoods and sites to the famous local icons. The intent is to show the range of things to do in San Francisco and to communicate that there are a lot of new things to see, like the de Young Museum.

Jef Loyola

Age: 40

Position: President, creative director

Education, background: Jef has been developing creative in San Francisco for over 15 years. Before The M-Line, Jef worked at Anderson & Lembke as an associate creative director on the Microsoft account. Prior to that, Jef developed direct mail campaigns for Apple computer at Wunderman Cato Johnson.

What drove your development of the concept?: The SFCVB commissioned consumer research in Chicago and Seattle to help drive creative development. The key insight was that while people love coming to San Francisco, they really have little idea what new things are going on here. They all know about our beautiful and famous landmarks but they wanted to know more about the “unexpected” things to do and see. The idea of sharing pictures on a digital camera brought in the modern-day ritual of sharing images into the ad. The pictures provide the “proof” you’ll want to back up the stories of your great experiences from your trip to San Francisco.

Working on next: Redesigning the SFCVB corporate identity to roll out at their Annual Luncheon on June 27; a campaign for The San Francisco Arts Commission celebrating the 40th anniversary of the Neighborhood Arts Program.

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