The FedEx-vs-UPS lobbying knife-fight

Reason TV's Nick Gillespie weighs in on the UPS-vs-FedEx lobbying knife fight with this entertaining white-board video.

“The move to screw over FedEx and its customers is contemptible, but it does make a sick sort of business sense: Why not use legislation to win what you can in the marketplace? And it tells us who the real villain is here: a federal government that is big enough and powerful enough to absolutely, positively guarantee that it can crush any business overnight.”

I wrote about this skirmish back in June, with a similar moral of the story:

Is it fair for FedEx and UPS to play by different rules? Is it fair to change the rules on FedEx in the middle of the game? Is the NLRA even fair?

Sadly, “fair competition,” doesn't really play a role in shipping–an industry that has been subsidized and regulated since its birth. Federal law nearly prohibits UPS and FedEx from competing on price. Other regulations–including labor laws–cramp their ingenuity.

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