Term limits are far from dead. Here's where to start getting them in Congress

Term limits ceased to be a practical political possibility when the 1994 Republican congressional majority failed to fulfill their Contract with America promise on the issue, right?

Wrong on both counts. The GOP Congress did vote on the issue, but the vote was rigged to insure that no concrete progress was achieved. And term limits, which continue to enjoy massive public support in 2010, CAN become a reality despite the previous setback.

Paul Jacob,who was a key leader of 1994 term limits campaign has posted an important Common Sense column suggesting that the incoming House Republican majority could take major steps on the issue right now.

“Having regained the majority, some Republicans are mumbling about 'granting exceptions' to committee chair limits for this guy and that guy and the other guy. But rampant exceptions to sensible reforms would show that nothing much is changing in how Congress does business. And a lot’s got to change,” Jacob said.

“Other Republicans, though, are talking about term limits not only for committee chairmen but for all leadership positions. The new Majority Leader-to-be, Eric Cantor, tells The Hill he’d support 'a six-year term limit for each position.'”

He also points to a constitutional amendment introduced by Sen. Tom Coburn, R-OK, that would allow senators to serve no more than two six-year terms and representatives no more than three two-year terms.

You can read Jacob's full column here.  For more on the Coburn amendment, go here.

Beltway ConfidentialCongressPoliticsUS

Just Posted

The Hotel Whitcomb on Market Street was one of many hotels that took in homeless people as part of The City’s shelter-in-place hotel program during the pandemic.<ins> (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)</ins>
Closing hotels could disconnect hundreds from critical health care services

‘That baseline of humanity and dignity goes a long way’

Pachama, a Bay Area startup, is using technology to study forests and harness the carbon-consuming power of trees. (Courtesy Agustina Perretta/Pachama)
Golden Gate Park visitors may take a survey about options regarding private car access on John F. Kennedy Drive, which has been the subject of controversy during the pandemic.<ins> (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)</ins>
Your chance to weigh in: Should JFK remain closed to cars?

Host of mobility improvements for Golden Gate Park proposed

San Francisco supervisors are considering plans to replace trash cans — a “Renaissance” garbage can is pictured on Market Street — with pricey, unnecessary upgrades. (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)
San Francisco must end ridiculous and expensive quest for ‘pretty’ trash cans

SF’s unique and pricey garbage bins a dream of disgraced former Public Works director

Dreamforce returned to San Francisco in person this week – but with a tiny sliver of past attendance. (Courtesy Salesforce)
Dreamforce returns with hundreds on hand, down from 170,000 in the past

High hopes for a larger Salesforce conference shriveled during the summer

Most Read