Tea Party caucus gets $1 billion in earmarks

Reid Wilson at Hotline reports:

Members of the Congressional Tea Party Caucus may tout their commitment to cutting government spending now, but they used the 111th Congress to request hundreds of earmarks that, taken cumulatively, added more than $1 billion to the federal budget.

According to a Hotline review of records compiled by Citizens Against Government Waste, the 52 members of the caucus, which pledges to cut spending and reduce the size of government, requested a total of 764 earmarks valued at $1,049,783,150 during Fiscal Year 2010, the last year for which records are available.

“It's disturbing to see the Tea Party Caucus requested that much in earmarks. This is their time to put up or shut up, to be blunt,” said David Williams, vice president for policy at Citizens Against Government Waste. “There's going to be a huge backlash if they continue to request earmarks.”

Hmm. Sounds like business as usual. It will be very interesting to watch the incoming class of new Republicans and see whether they stay more principled than their GOP predecessors.

 

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