Survey finds only 43 percent would re-elect Obama now

Only 43 percent of voters surveyed by the Zogby/O'Leary Poll would vote for President Obama less than a year after he was elected, or about the same level of support President Clinton won in 1992 in a three-way race with the first President Bush and former EDS executive and national political gadfly Ross Perot.

Perhaps even more worrisome for the president is that only 37 percent of independents queried in the survey said they would support Obama. That figure appears to be consistent with exit polling following the Virginia and New Jersey governorship races which indicated a seismic shift among independents away from Obama and to Republican candidates Bob McDonnell and Chris Christie.

And on the question of trust, Obama also fell far short of his performance during the 2008 presidential race. A year later, Zogby/O'Leary find that 42 percent of voters say they do not trust the Obama White House “at all” to gain passage in Congress of legislation that will create new jobs in 2010, and another 11 percent say they don't have much trust that the president can succeed on that score.

The survey is conducted by pollster Brad O'Leary in conjunction with Zogby International.

“President Obama’s popularity with the voting public has been eroding for some time, but these numbers really drive home the point,” said O’Leary. “Most voters don’t trust the president on the number one issue of the day,  job creation.  On top of that, a surprising plurality of voters, and Independent voters in particular, don’t side with President Obama on the number one issue to him:  whether or not he should be President.”

 

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