Stargazers ready for rare event in supermoon eclipse

LOS ANGELES — Stargazers are about to get a double celestial treat when a total lunar eclipse combines with a so-called supermoon.

Those in the United States, Europe, Africa and western Asia can view the rare coupling, weather permitting, Sunday night or early Monday.

It’s the first time the events have made a twin appearance since 1982, and they won’t again until 2033.

When a full moon makes its closest approach to Earth, it appears bigger and brighter than usual and is known as a supermoon.

That will coincide with a full lunar eclipse where the moon, Earth and sun will be lined up, with Earth’s shadow totally obscuring the moon.

The event will occur on the U.S. East Coast at 10:11 p.m. EDT (0211 GMT) and last about an hour.

In Europe, the action will unfold before dawn Monday.

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