Serial killer could collect $1,600 monthly disability pension even while on death row

There lots of outrageous stories about people who collect public pensions after they commit crimes, but this one may take the cake:

The man accused of being the notorious ” Grim Sleeper” serial killer has reportedly collected $300,000 in pension payments, and will continue to collect them until he dies.

City documents obtained by L.A. Weekly show that Lonnie Franklin Jr., 57, has been collecting monthly disability pension checks from the L.A. pension system for 19 years after being injured while working as a garbage collector.

The first checks, in 1991, were a little less than $900; they are now $1,658.54 per month, according to documents obtained by the Weekly, which reported that his running total so far is $300,000. If he lives to age 82, that amount would reach $1 million.

The Office of the City Attorney told the Weekly that Franklin cannot be cut off, even if he’s convicted and sent to death row. He or his family will be paid until he dies.

Emphasis added. I’m sure California taxpayers feel good about their hard-earned money going to enrich a serial killer every month.


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