Security company accused of being unfair to workers

A routine contract extending the security services for Muni could be the subject of debate today as the Board of Supervisors addresses accusations that the company that has been handling the public transportations agency’s security since the late 1990s is unfair to its workers.

The Municipal Transportation Agency board of directors approved a $17.1 million contract in December despite the dissent of two board members who were concerned that employees of the San Francisco-based company were not part of a union. Of the six original bidders for the contract, many of them union, none offered an experienced crew of armed security, according to Muni officials.

In a Government Audit and Oversight Committee, however, Supervisor Chris Daly said The City should explore options to make sure King Security workers were compensated as well as union security firms.

The current contract with the company, which was set to expire Dec. 31, will continue into March as there is still money left in the agreement. If an agreement isn’t reached by then, the work to protect Muni’s facilities and guard the workers who collect money from fare boxes could fall to the San Francisco Police Department.

The debate over the security detail heated up after SEIU organizer Deirdre Lehn brought up former and current King Security employees to several public meetings who claim they were harassed after trying to unionize. One worker claimed he was fired for talking with SEIU.

But King Security owner Kim King said the union is using strong-arm tactics on her company, which has several clients but only two public contracts, Muni and the U.S. Coast Guard.

“The union has fabricated issues that don’t exist,” King said. “We did not wrongfully terminate the employee. The union is harassing us. I have messages saved on my voice mail that the union would put pressure on the Board of Supervisors.”

The Board of Supervisors will take up whether to approve the new three-year contract during its meeting today at 2 p.m.

bbegin@examiner.com

businessBusiness & Real EstateLocal

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

Temporary high-occupancy vehicle lanes will be added to sections of state Highway 1 and U.S. Highway 101 through The City including Park Presidio Boulevard to help keep transit flowing as traffic increases. (Photo by Ekevara Kitpowsong/Special to S.F. Examiner)
Transit and high-occupancy vehicle lanes coming to some of The City’s busiest streets

Changes intended to improve transit reliability as traffic increases with reopening

Tents fill up a new safe camping site in a former parking lot at 180 Jones St. in the Tenderloin on Thursday, June 11, 2020. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Proposal for major expansion of safe sleeping sites gets cool reception in committee

Supervisor Mandelman calls for creation of more temporary shelter sites to get homeless off streets

Demonstrators commemorated the life of George Floyd and others killed by police outside S.F. City Hall on June 1, 2020.<ins></ins>
Chauvin verdict: SF reacts after jury finds ex-officer guilty on all charges

San Franciscans were relieved Tuesday after jurors found a former Minneapolis police… Continue reading

San Francisco Unified School District Board member Faauuga Moliga, right, pictured with Superintendent Vincent Matthews on the first day back to classrooms, will be board vice president for the remander of the 2121 term. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Faauuga Moliga named as school board vice president to replace Alison Collins

The San Francisco school board on Tuesday selected board member Fauuga Moliga… Continue reading

Legislation by Supervisor Rafael Mandelman would require The City to add enough new safe camping sites, such as this one at 180 Jones St. in the Tenderloin, to accomodate everyone living on the street. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
City would create sites for hundreds of tents under new homeless shelter proposal

Advocates say funding better spent on permanent housing

Most Read