Schumer: Health bill's unpopularity 'has peaked' — legislation will 'become more and more popular'

Meeting reporters after passage of the Democratic national health care bill, Sen. Charles Schumer seemed sensitive to the commentary pointing out that the Democratic legislation is overwhelmingly unpopular with the American people. “I don't believe that,” Schumer said. “I believe that the negativity that Leader McConnell and others have continually displayed on the floor has peaked, and now, when people learn what's actually in the bill and all the good it does, it will become more and more popular.”

But in a sure sign that Democratic leaders did not want to encounter any negativity on the day the bill passed, Majority Leader Harry Reid announced before the news conference began that, “We're not going to take any questions.”

Reid praised the bill as bringing Americans “one step closer to making Ted Kennedy's dream a reality.” Sen. Chris Dodd said that, “On this Christmas Eve, I can't think of a better gift the U.S. Senate could give to the American people.” And Sen. Richard Durbin said the legislation “lit a light of hope for 50 million Americans who went to bed last night without the benefit of health insurance.” (It's not clear where Durbin got that figure; Schumer cited 31 million.) But no one took any questions.

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