Sarah Moore: Using real moms for marketing

When Sarah Moore, the San Francisco half of advertising consultancy MomWise, was a little girl, her father was an executive at a major advertising firm.

One day he brought home storyboards from a Flintstones Vitamins commercial, and when young Sarah saw the same commercial on television during morning cartoons the next day she witnessed the way marketing connects to everyday life.

Now that Moore is a mother and a former senior ad executive herself, she has long recognized that such a relationship between marketers and their real lives can give a significant advantage in her business.

“Because moms control close to 90 percent of the household spending in the country, there will always be a place for marketers who empathize with mom,” Moore said.

With that in mind, Moore and her longtime friend Betsy Westhoff this year created MomWise, a consultancy that harnesses the collective empathy of marketers who are moms themselves.

Moore, who said in marketing she most enjoys “jumping into the target’s head,” has two boys, Henry, 12, and Christopher, 10. She was a senior executive for almost 20 years, most recently as management director for DDB Worldwide in San Francisco.

She said too many times in the boardroom her colleagues would turn to her for the “mom” opinion, because she was the only mother in the room. And yet, when groups of mothers were consulted for marketing decisions it was typically done as a focus group, so the mothers were thinking as consumers rather than marketers.

MomWise for the first time, according to Moore, combines the wisdom of mothers and marketers. The company’s resources include a panel they’ve convoked, drawing advice from more than 55 “marketing moms.”

Moore and Westhoff began the venture earlier this year without any startup investments, Moore said.

The two ran consultancy projects for Munchkin Baby Products and Peapod.com, an online grocer, which became the beta phase of MomWise, and contributed the opening capital.

“People are beginning to think how moms are influencing products that are not traditionally considered mom brands,” Moore said.

businessBusiness & Real Estate

Just Posted

San Francisco Giants manager Gabe Kapler, pictured in July at Oracle Park, says team members simultaneously can be “measured and calm” and “looking to push the accelerator.” (Chris Victorio/Special to The Examiner)
How Gabe Kapler sets the tone for Giants’ success with strategy, mindset

‘There’s no doubt in my mind that he’s the hands-down manager of the year’

Artist Agnieszka Pilat, pictured with Spot the Robot Dog from Boston Robotics, has a gallery show opening at Modernism. (Courtesy Agnieszka Pilat)
Screenshots of VCs, Kanye and tech parties by the Bay

In this week’s roundup, Ben Horowitz’s surprising hip-hop knowledge and the chic tech crowd at Shack15

If he secured a full term in the Senate, Newsom would become the most powerful Californian Democrat since Phil Burton at the height of his career, or maybe ever. <ins>(Kevin Hume/The Examiner)</ins>
Firefighters extinguish burning material near Lake Tahoe on Sept. 3 in the wake of the Caldor Fire; environmental scientists say the huge fire is bringing to light deficiencies in forest management. <ins>(Max Whittaker/New York Times)</ins>
Cal Fire, timber industry must face an inconvenient truth

We are logging further into the wildfire and climate crisis

Changing zoning in San Francisco neighborhoods where single family homes prevail is crucial in the effort to achieve equity. (Shutterstock)
To make SF livable, single-family zoning must be changed

Let’s move to create affordable housing for working class families

Most Read