Sacramento police panned for slow response to Capitol clash

A wounded man stands by another wounded man sitting on the steps of the California state Capitol after members of right-wing extremists groups holding a rally outside the state Capitol building clashed with counter-protesters in Sacramento on Sunday. (Paul Kitagaki Jr./The Sacramento Bee via AP)

A wounded man stands by another wounded man sitting on the steps of the California state Capitol after members of right-wing extremists groups holding a rally outside the state Capitol building clashed with counter-protesters in Sacramento on Sunday. (Paul Kitagaki Jr./The Sacramento Bee via AP)

SACRAMENTO — Authorities were anticipating violence as a white nationalist group planned a demonstration at the California Capitol, and they brought in more than 100 officers to patrol the grounds.

But after 10 people were injured Sunday, they’re now facing criticism about whether they were properly prepared. The demonstration quickly turned violent in a clash with a larger group of counter-protesters.

Cres Vellucci, an observer with the National Lawyers Guild, said Monday that the California Highway Patrol and Sacramento city police failed to separate the two groups before the violence began.

He says they were slow to protect victims being assaulted and slow to get medical help.

Members of the Traditionalist Worker Party were confronted as they approached the rally site, and violence erupted.

CHP spokesman Officer George Granada says police had no obligation to make sure the group’s members made it safely to the rally.

CaliforniaCalifornia Highway PatrolCapitol buildingdemonstrationnationalistsprotesters clashSacramentoSacramento PoliceStabbings

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

Health care workers in the intensive care unit at Providence Saint John’s Health Center in Santa Monica, with Alejandro Balderas, a 44-year-old patient who later died. Even in California, a state with a coronavirus vaccination rate well above average, the number of people hospitalized with COVID-19 has nearly doubled in the past two weeks, according to a New York Times database. (Isadora Kosofsky/The New York Times)
Why COVID took off in California, again

‘The good news is: The vaccines are working’

A kayaker on the water at Lake Oroville, which stands at 33 percent full and 40 percent of historical average when this photograph was taken on Tuesday, June 29, 2021 in Oroville, Calif. (Brian van der Brug / Los Angeles Times via Tribune News Service)
A kayaker on the water at Lake Oroville, which stands at 33 percent full and 40 percent of historical average when this photograph was taken on Tuesday, June 29, 2021 in Oroville, Calif. (Brian van der Brug / Los Angeles Times via Tribune News Service)
Facing ‘dire water shortages,’ California bans Delta pumping

By Rachel Becker CalMatters In an aggressive move to address “immediate and… Continue reading

Students practice identifying species in the school garden at Verde Elementary in Richmond during summer camp. (Photo courtesy of Verde Elementary)
Reading, writing and bike riding: How schools spent summer helping students recover from pandemic

By Sydney Johnson EdSource Bicycles typically aren’t allowed on the blacktop at… Continue reading

The San Francisco Public Utilities Commission launched a pilot program that offers up to 90 percent discounts on water and sewer bills for eligible customers. (Andri Tambunan/Special to ProPublica)
How does 90% off your water bill sound? Here’s who qualifies

The San Francisco Public Utilities Commission announced this week it is launching… Continue reading

Most Read