Residents favor housing at controversial marina site

Residents are showing support for a new plan to build 796 condominiums on Peninsula Marina, the site of a controversial 1,900-condo proposal rejected by voters in November 2004.

Developer Paul Powers offered three development concepts at a workshop last Thursday, including one with a 300,000-square-foot “super retail” center; another with 200,000 square feet of retail and four new office buildings; and Peninsula Park, with nearly 800 condos, a 200-room hotel, 10,000 square feet of retail and a two-acre community park on the 33-acre site adjacent to Pete’s Harbor.

More than 70 people attended the workshop. While some preferred an all-commercial option and others rallied for open space, the majority favored Powers’ mixed-use residential proposal. Current zoning would allow for either of the all-commercial options, according to planner Jill Ekas. The 796-condo proposal would require re-zoning.

“Putting housing here would tie Redwood City to the Bay,” said resident Fred Grosser. Some workshop attendees said the marina currently feels cut off from the rest of the city, even though it is about a half-mile from downtown, and argued that building a Bayside neighborhood would change that.

Others thought that separation could harm the project and place housing too far from the city’s urban core and transit corridor.

“Other cities, like Palo Alto and San Jose, have put commercial uses by the Bay,” resident Adrian Brandt said. “I’m not saying they’ve done it right, but I don’t want to see housing that’s cut off from the city.”

Adding an all-commercial project on the property would involve filling the entire Peninsula Marina and building on top of it, according to sketches provided by Powers. By contrast, the housing option would fill about half of the 14-acre marina, leaving the other half open to boaters.

Powers previously proposed a development at the same site that included 1,900 condominiums, but it was defeated by voters in 2004 amid complaints that it would be too big and too dense.

Early traffic analysis shows that an all-commercial site would generate more than 14,000 car trips per day, compared with 4,576 per day for the mixed-use housing proposal, according to Ekas.

Two more Peninsula Park workshops are scheduled, for Sept. 28 at the Veterans Memorial Senior Center and Oct. 17 at City Hall. Both are scheduled for 7 p.m.

bwinegarner@examiner.com

businessBusiness & Real EstateLocal

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

Dave Hodges, pastor at Zide Door, the Church of Entheogenic Plants that include marijuana and psilocybin mushrooms, holds some psychedelic mushrooms inside the Oakland church on Friday, July 22, 2021. (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)
Psychedelic spirituality: Inside a growing Bay Area religious movement

‘They are guiding us into something ineffable’

A former inmate and a sheriff’s deputy are among the first four members chosen to serve on the newly created Sheriff’s Department Oversight Board. (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)
Years after fight club scandal, Sheriff’s oversight board takes shape

‘We want to promote law enforcement best practices’

More than a thousand people gathered in front of the California Capitol building to protest Gov. Gavin Newsom’s stay at home order and demand that the state re-open on May 1, 2020. (Photo by Anne Wernikoff for CalMatters)
Newsom blames ‘right-wing pundits’ for COVID surge

By Emily Hoeven CalMatters Gov. Gavin Newsom on Monday placed the blame… Continue reading

Strong California revenues will allow the state to commit to offering no-cost food to every student. (Amanda Mills/Pixnio)
How California plans to offer free daily meals to 6 million public school students

By Ali Tadayon EdSource With one in every six children facing hunger… Continue reading

Most Read