Remodeled home in Noe Valley

The owner of this Noe Valley home intended for it to be purchased as a tenancy in common (TIC), although the entire unit is for sale for prospective families or landlords.

“You could connect the two units and have four levels of occupancy for one family in one dwelling or you could have it as it is now as two homes — like tenants and TICs,” says Pete Brannigan, the listing agent with DJ Droubi & Co.

The building was originally intended as a set of flats when it was built in 1908 but it has been vacant for at least two years. The current owner purchased it 18 months ago and did not have much trouble vacating the tenants at the time.

The redone home has views from three of the four floors and artful kitchen areas with dark cherry wood, stainless steel, walk-in pantries and Calcutta marble. Gilligan Construction, a husband and wife high-end design team in San Francisco, was hired for the redesign.

The backyard was also redone recently with a Zen garden that can be seen from all four levels. “It’s also in a nice area of Noe Valley,” says Brannigan. “It’s close to 24th Street shops and restaurants.”

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

PG&E is locked in a battle with San Francisco city officials over the cost of connecting city projects using public power to the grid.<ins> (Courtesy photo)</ins>
SF challenges PG&E’s power moves

Utility uses expensive hookups to discourage public power use

Mayor London Breed said The City would pause reopening plans in order to “make sure we continue our cautious and deliberate approach.” <ins>(Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)</ins>
SF slows down reopening after COVID-19 cases rise

Restaurants no longer permitted to increase indoor dining capacity to 50 percent

Toilet (Shutterstock)
Table salt and poop: Testing for COVID-19 in S.F. sewage

The City’s sewers could provide an early warning of fresh outbreaks

A study published in the December 2016 Scientific Reports journal reveals that brain activity increases when people’s political beliefs are challenged. <ins>(Screenshot Scientific Reports)</ins>
Now is the time to make friends with enemies

We can be civil to others who have different political beliefs

Most Read