Rasmussen tells Western CPAC GOP will gain 55 House seats; Majority think U.S. is 'over-taxed'

Pollster Scott Rasmussen told Western CPAC attendees last night that he expects a 55-seat Republican gain in the Nov. 2 congressional election, according to Human Events' John Gizzi.

Rasmussen, who was the first pollster to spot the surge that led to Scott Brown's upset victory for the Senate seat formerly held by Ted Kennedy in Massachusett, told the assembled conservatives that Senate control will be determined by how five races currently too close to call are decided.

He also identified the top three issues in the campaign as “one-the economy, two-the economy, and three-the economy,” and he noted that “by two-to-one, voters say they prefer a congressman who will reduce overall spending to one who promises to bring a ‘fair share’ of government spending to their congressional district,” according to Gizzi.

You can read Gizzi's full report here.

Rasmussen has also released results today of his latest survey, which shows that 66 percent of Americans believe the U.S. is “over-taxed,” 70 percent say “the government does not spend taxpayer’s money wisely and fairly,” and 61 percent “think the government has too much power and money.”

Rasmussen also found that a big majority of those not claiming to be members of either of the two major political parties share such views:

“Eighty-five percent (85%) of Republicans and 60% of adults who are not affiliated with either of the major political parties believe the government has too much power and money, a view shared by just 39% of Democrats,” he said.

Not surprisingly, Rasmussen also found that “just 47% of government workers say the government has too much power and money, compared to 65% of those who work in the private sector.”

For more from Rasmussen on the survey, which interviewed 1,000 adults between Oct. 11-12 and has a three-percent margin of error, go here.

 

 

 

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