Races to Watch if you care about Good Government

Everyone talks about “reform” but a few politicians actually try to do something about reform.

Similarly, Americans consider Congress to be corrupt, but a few politicians fit that description better than others.

So, whether you’re a liberal or a conservative — or neither — if you care about good government, these are the races to follow:

Lisa Murkowski: If either Joe Miller or Joe McAdams win today, the Republican Party will a bit cleaner, and the Alaska Mafia on K Street of former Murkowski, Stevens, and Young staffers will be a bit poorer.

Harry Reid: The top recipient of K Street cash, Reid has the backing of the Republican head of the casino lobby and of the drug lobby that profits at your expense from the health-care bill. Reid’s ex-staffers fill the biggest K Street firms, representing the biggest clients. Lobbyists profiting from his energy subsidies also raise funds for him.

Michael Bennet and Russ Feingold: I don’t like most of the voting records of these two Democrats, but they’ve fought for cleaner government. I don’t like Feingold’s campaign finance law, but in general, he’s a clean, honest guy. Bennet, meanwhile sponsored a bill to prohibit congressmen from lobbying for private parties or local or state governments after leaving office — a quixotic proposal, but a great one. They both could lose.

Joseph Cao: The guy who knocked of “Dollar” Bill Jefferson is in danger of losing to another machine politician in New Orleans.

Beltway ConfidentialUS

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