Public-sector unions try to bail out Democrats

Afraid for their precious taxpayer-funded largesse, public-sector unions are stepping up their campaign spending order to keep their hand in the public trough::

The National Education Association, the largest U.S. teachers union, has independently spent more than $3.4 million that must be disclosed, including ad buys and direct-mail campaigns, for the key electioneering period from Sept. 1 to Oct. 14. The NEA spent $444,000 during the same stretch in 2006.

The American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees has nearly matched its 2006 midterm outlays. It has spent $2.1 million on electioneering since the beginning of last month, according to FEC filings for two campaign committees associated with the union. That is just shy of the $2.2 million spent for that period in 2006.

And, surprise, the reporters offers that neither AFSCME nor the American Federation of Teachers would  comment on where the money was coming from. An NEA representative said that it was a combination of dues and voluntary donations.

If I were them, though, I’d be saving my money. After all, given voter frustration with spending, it looks like funds are going to be getting a little bearish.

Beltway ConfidentialeconomyNEAUS

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