Professor under fire for ‘white genocide’ Twitter post

PHILADELPHIA –– Drexel University officials had a quiet holiday weekend loudly interrupted Sunday night, after to a professor took to Twitter to let loose some extreme views.

“All I Want for Christmas is White Genocide,” associate professor of politics and global studies George Ciccariello-Maher posted Christmas Eve.

He then wrote Sunday: “To clarify: when the whites were massacred during the Haitian revolution, that was a good thing indeed.”

Not long thereafter, Ciccariello-Maher’s tweets were picked up by conservative websites. His tweets are not public, or at least weren’t as of Monday morning. It is public, though, that he has over 10,000 Twitter followers and has posted over 16,000 times.

Sunday, Ciccariello-Maher said he had “sent a satirical tweet about an imaginary concept, ‘white genocide.’

“‘For those who haven’t bothered to do their research, ‘white genocide’ is an idea invented by white supremacists and used to denounce everything from interracial relationships to multicultural policies (and most recently, against a tweet by State Farm Insurance). It is a figment of the racist imagination, it should be mocked, and I’m glad to have mocked it.”

Many readers and social media followers didn’t get the humor, though –– and his employer didn’t either.
Drexel condemned the Twitter post. “While the University recognizes the right of its faculty to freely express their thoughts and opinions in public debate, professor Ciccariello-Maher’s comments are utterly reprehensible, deeply disturbing, and do not in any way reflect the values of the university.

Ciccariello-Maher teaches in Drexel’s Department of History and Politics. His biography on Drexel’s website says he is “an expert and frequent media commentator on social movements, particularly in Latin America.”

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