PPP: At least one Senator Brown is in trouble

At least one Senator Brown faces a tough re-election — Democratic Sen. Sherrod Brown of Ohio. Not only does he trail Mike DeWine, the Republican former senator whom he defeated in 2006, but an early PPP poll of the races shows him topping out at only 43 percent, even against candidates who have very low name recognition.

Brown and DeWine are deadlocked at 43% each. DeWine may not run again, having just been elected state attorney general last month. But three other candidates who could jump into the fray to challenge the vulnerable Brown are incoming secretary of state Jon Husted, 4th-District Congressman Jim Jordan, and incoming Lieutenant Governor Mary Taylor. Despite being an unknown quantity to 65% of Ohioans, Taylor comes closest to leading Brown, trailing only 38-40. Next is Husted (unknown to 62%), with a 38-43 deficit, and finally Jordan (unknown to 73%), trailing 35-43.

Maybe Brown has been making too many fundraising pitches on The Ed Show — in a recent appearance, I think he repeated his campaign website address about eight times (Rachel Maddow, take note). His defense of the omnibus earlier this week probably doesn't help, either — he said that the 6,600 earmarks in the bill was “very few earmarks.”

DeWine, a moderate, was just elected attorney general of Ohio and is probably in no position to run. But a run by Jordan, a conservative, is a very interesting possibility. It could solve a lot of redistricting problems.

Beltway ConfidentialUS

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