Postal Service plant closures will be 'a mess'

AP file photoLetter carrier Sean Bailey moves boxes of mail to his van to begin delivery at a post office in Seattle.

The U.S. Postal Service's plan to close 252 mail processing facilities and cut 28,000 jobs by the end of next year faces big obstacles.

Deciding which plants to close will be difficult and likely inspire intense opposition from communities. Actually closing them could take a year or longer, and most workers whose jobs are eliminated will stay employed under union rules.

Most of the job cuts will come from attrition and retirements, not layoffs, while remaining workers get shuffled into new locations and positions.

Postal officials say they can save $3 billion by 2015 by getting rid of buildings, running equipment more efficiently, operating fewer mail trucks and cutting employees. The cuts are aimed at helping the agency avert bankruptcy after years of red ink and declining mail volume.

Just Posted

Report: Large parts of SF ‘not adequately protected’ from fires after major earthquake

Civil grand jury urges expansion of emergency firefighting water system

Climate strike organizers say SFUSD blocked student participation

The organizers behind Friday’s Climate Strike in San Francisco are accusing the… Continue reading

City puts closure of long-term mental health beds on hold

In response to public outrage over a proposal to suspend 41 permanent… Continue reading

Here we go again – new dog rules in Golden Gate National Recreation Area

The GGNRA released a 2019 Superintendent’s Compendium that makes significant changes that appear to implement parts of the ill-fated Dog Management Plan.

Most Read