Political class, Middle America headed in opposite directions on economy

A new Rasmussen Reports survey turns up new evidence of a yawning divide between the nation's Political Class and the rest of the country on what to do about the federal government's fiscal crisis.

The survey found “that 57% of likely U.S. voters think reducing federal government spending is more important than reducing the deficit. Thirty-four percent (34%) put reducing the deficit first,” according to Rasmussen.

But when the same issue was put before members of the two groups, the results were profoundly different:

“It’s telling to note that while 65% of mainstream voters believe cutting spending is more important, 72% of the Political Class say the primary emphasis should be on deficit reduction,” Rasmussen said.

The same survey found a distinct lack of optimism among mainstream voters concerning the prospects that 2011 will see much progress being made by President Obama, the Democratic Senate and Republican House. 

“Most voters are still not convinced, even with a new Republican majority in the House, that Congress will actually cut government spending substantially over the next year.  GOP voters are among the most doubtful,” the pollster said.

“Sixty-nine percent (69%) of voters, in fact, are pessimistic about what Congress will accomplish in terms of government spending.”

For more from Rasmussen, go here.

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