Pelosi: ‘We didn’t lose because of me.’

Honestly, I don’t know whether the soon-to-be-former Madam Speaker believes this or she’s just awesomely bad a spinning:

“We didn’t lose the election because of me,” Ms. Pelosi told National Public Radio in an interview that aired Friday morning. “Our members do not accept that.”

Instead, the California Democrat attributes the loss of at least 60 seats to high unemployment and “$100 million of outside, unidentified funding.”

“Any party that cannot turn (9.5% unemployment) into political gains should hang up the gloves,” she said.

Well, I guess the comments about employment suggest we have toe in the reality-based community, but other than that — oy. At this point suggesting that Democrats were buried under an avalanche of “outside, unidentified funding” is just an outright lie:

Overall, Democratic candidates in the 63 races that flipped to the GOP had $206.4 million behind them, a tally that includes candidate fundraising and spending by parties and interests. That compares to only $171.7 million for their GOP rivals.

Also, note that Democrats out-raised and outspent Republicans in every category this election cycle. And finally, I hate to break it to her, but yes, there’s 161,203 reasons to believe Democrats lost their seats because of Pelosi:

More than $65 million was spent on 161,203 ads that targeted Pelosi from January 1 through last week’s election, according to a new analysis of TV ads for CNN by Campaign Media Analysis Group.

Beltway Confidentialcampaign spendingNancy PelosiUS

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