Only one in five Americans want government to regulate the Internet

Upwards of 60 percent of Americans opposed Obamacare before it was passed by Congress and signed into law by President Obama. Now that it's on the books, the same percentage want Obamacare repealed, according to Rasmussen Reports.

Now add another big expansion of federal power draws big public opposition and little public support even as Obama's Federal Communications Commission approve a Net Neutrality program for which federal courts have previously ruled the agency has no authority to implement.

“The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that only 21% of Likely U.S. Voters want the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to regulate the Internet as it does radio and television,” Rasmussen said. “Fifty-four percent (54%) are opposed to such regulation, and 25% are not sure.”

Rasmussen said the survey was completed shortly after the FCC's Dec. 21 vote to adopt Net Neutrality regulations that will essentially put the federal government in charge of regulating content and access to the Internet.

FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski, who was appointed by Obama, was joined in voting for the proposal by Democrats Michael Copps and Mignon Clyburn. Republicans Meredith Attwell Baker and Robert M. McDowell voted against it .

“Republicans and unaffiliated voters overwhelmingly oppose FCC regulation of the Internet, while Democrats are more evenly divided. Those who use the Internet most are most opposed to FCC regulations,” Rasmussen said.

“By a 52% to 27% margin, voters believe that more free market competition is better than more regulation for protecting Internet users,” the pollster reported.

For more from Rasmussen, go here.  For more on the FCC vote and Net Neutrality policy, go here and here.

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