Obama: Still far from solving police, community issues

First lady Michelle Obama tries to keep her dress from blowing as she walks down the steps of Air Force One with President Barack Obama at Andrews Air Force Base in Maryland on Tuesday. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

First lady Michelle Obama tries to keep her dress from blowing as she walks down the steps of Air Force One with President Barack Obama at Andrews Air Force Base in Maryland on Tuesday. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama, concluding a more than three-hour meeting Wednesday with community activists, politicians and law enforcement officials, said America is “not even close” to where it needs to be in terms of resolving issues between police and the communities they serve.

Obama expressed optimism, however, and said the participants — who included members of the Black Lives Matter movement — agreed such conversations need to continue despite emotions running raw.

Obama has devoted his attention this week to the gun violence directed at police officers as well as shootings by police. The focus comes a few days after a black Army veteran killed five police officers in revenge for police shooting black men in Baton Rouge, Louisiana and the Minneapolis suburbs.

On Tuesday, Obama attended a memorial service for the five slain Dallas officers and called the families of Alton Sterling in Louisiana and Philando Castile in Minnesota to offer condolences. He said he wanted Americans to have an open heart so that they can learn to look at the world through each other’s eyes, and Wednesday’s meeting followed that theme.

He said Wednesday it was key to set up the “kind of respectful conversations we’ve had here” across the country.

“The conversation that took place around this table is very different than the one that you see on a day-to-day or hourly basis in the media,” Obama said.

But Obama also said the “bad news” was that making progress is hard.

“We’re not even close to being there yet, where we want to be,” he said, noting the “diversity of views around the table.”

The nearly three dozen people invited to the White House included some police organizations that have little regard for Black Lives Matter, a group they blame for inciting violence against police officers. White House officials acknowledged that enhancing the trust that has been frayed in so many communities will be a job for future presidents, but they said Obama was determined to get all sides to commit to steps they can take to improve relations.

Those attending the meeting included Gov. John Bel Edwards of Louisiana and Mayor Chris Coleman of St. Paul, Minnesota, the two locations where police shootings sparked protests around the country. Mayors from Los Angeles, Newark, New Jersey, and Anaheim, California, also attended. From the administration, Attorney General Loretta Lynch joined the president.

Also on the list were Mica Grimm, with Black Lives Matter Minnesota, and DeRay Mckesson, who was arrested Saturday in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, on a charge of obstructing a highway. Police said Mckesson “intentionally” placed himself in the road after protesters were repeatedly warned to remain on private property or the curb. Mckesson was released from jail Sunday. The Rev. Al Sharpton also attended.

“Going forward, I want to hear ideas from even more Americans about how we can address these challenges together as one nation. That means you,” Obama said earlier Wednesday on Facebook.

He called on people to submit their stories and ideas to go to: go.wh.gov/VDPvKz

Barack ObamaBlack Lives Matterlaw enforcementUS

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