North County high school district o place bond measure before voters

Adding to what is shaping up to be a crowded November ballot, a North County high school district is asking voters to approve a $136.9 million bond for district improvements.

The Jefferson Union High School District Board voted June 20 to go for a $107 million bond, far larger than the $30 million bond approved in 1995, Superintendent Michael Crilly said.

The bond, if passed, would provide money for improvements to science facilities, athletic fields, gymnasiums and the Westmoor Giammona Pool.

Crilly said the district actually has about $200 million worth of needs, but that amount would be too high for voters.

The Westmoor pool is run jointly by the district and the city and, built in 1972, is in major need of repair, Crilly said.

“It’s kind of on life support right now in terms of its condition,” Associate Superintendent Gary Johnson said.

The building needs $4 million to $5 million in work, Crilly said, which includes the cost to tear it down and build an entirely new complex.

Other improvements include renovating all of the athletic fields by installing all-weather tracks and all-weather turf, which are popular on the Peninsula now.

Jefferson High School could see a new gym to go alongside its 1937 “pit gym,” where the bleachers begin about eight feet above court level. The portables at the school may also be removed if the bond passes.

Crilly said that the irrigation systems installed in the 1960s for the grass fields were another big issue.

“We have more gophers than we have kids,” he said.

Daly City Mayor Michael Guingona expressed support for the bond measure at Monday’s Daly City Council meeting, saying he and Councilman Sal Torres met with district officials.

City Councilwoman Judith Christensen also was supportive of the bond effort but was curious to see “what kind of chance it has.”

“I know that there are going to be a lot of bonds,” the former science and special education teacher said.

San Mateo County is seeking a one-eighth-cent sales tax in November to support city and county parks and state infrastructure bonds are expected to dominate the fall campaign.

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