No clear winner in Clinton-Obama tug-of-war

Democrat Barack Obama won more states than Hillary Clinton on Super Tuesday, although they split the delegates, effectively guaranteeing their battle will rage on for months.

Although Clinton took the two biggest prizes, California and New York, along with half a dozen other states, Obama won 13 contests on a day that Clinton once predicted would deliver her the presidential nomination.

Accordingly, Obama tucked several shots at Clinton into the customarily soaring rhetoric of his election-night speech. He said she has “taken more money from Washington lobbyists than either Republican in this race.”

“If I am your nominee, my opponent will not be able to say that I voted for the war in Iraq, because I didn’t, or that I gave George Bush the benefit of the doubt on Iran, because I haven’t, or that I support the Bush-Cheney doctrine of not talking to leaders we don’t like, because I profoundly disagree with that approach,” he told enraptured supporters in Chicago.

Clinton returned fire by subtly inferring that Obama is an inspirational show horse with insufficient experience to win the White House.

“What we need is someone ready on day one to solve our problems,” she said.

“Because when the bright lights are off and the cameras are gone, who can you count on to listen to you, to stand up for you, to deliver solutions for you?”

The prolonged nature of the campaign appears to be favoring Obama, who faces off against Clinton in a handful of contests on Saturday, followed by the Battle for the Potomac — Virginia, Maryland and Washington, D.C. — on Tuesday.

Furthermore, exit polling indicates that Obama is beginning to chip away at Clinton’s traditional advantage among women and whites. Obama also won among men in general, although Clinton won Hispanics, an increasingly influential group of voters.

Obama won Illinois, Georgia, Delaware, Kansas, North Dakota, Alabama, Connecticut, Minnesota, Missouri, Idaho, Alaska, Colorado and Utah. In addition to California and New York, Clinton won Oklahoma, Tennessee, Arkansas, Massachusetts, New Jersey and Arizona.

bsammon@dcexaminer.com

LocalUS

Just Posted

A felled tree in Sydney G. Walton Square blocks part of a lane on Front Street following Sunday’s storm on Monday, Oct. 25, 2021. (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)
After the rain: What San Francisco learned from a monster storm

Widespread damage underscored The City’s susceptibility to heavy wind and rain

Plan Bay Area 2050 is an expansive plan guiding the region’s growth and development over the next three decades. The regional plan addresses progressive policy priorities like a universal basic income and a region-wide rent cap, alongside massive new spending on affordable housing and transportation infrastructure. (Shutterstock)
$1.4 trillion ‘blueprint’ would address Bay Area’s housing, transit woes

Analyzing the big ticket proposals in ‘Plan Bay Area 2050’

A felled tree in San Francisco is pictured on Fillmore Street following a major storm that produced high winds and heavy rains on Oct. 24, 2021. (Photo courtesy of Philip Ford)
Storm updates: Rainiest October day in San Francisco history

Rainfall exceeded 10 inches in parts of the Bay Area

On Sunday, California bore the brunt of what meteorologists referred to as a bomb cyclone and an atmospheric river, a convergence of storms that brought more than half a foot of rain to parts of the Bay Area, along with high winds, concerns about flash floods and the potential for heavy snow in the Sierra Nevada. Much of the Bay Area was under a flash flood watch on Sunday, with the National Weather Service warning of the potential for mudslides across the region. (NOAA via The New York Times)
Bomb cyclone, atmospheric river combine to pummel California with rain and wind

What you need to know about this historic weather event

The Department of Building Inspection, at 49 South Van Ness Ave., has been mired in scandal since since its creation by voter referendum under Proposition G in 1994. (Courtesy SF.gov)
The Department of Building Inspection, at 49 South Van Ness Ave., has been mired in scandal since its creation by voter referendum under Proposition G in 1994. (Courtesy SF.gov)
Whistleblowing hasn’t worked at the SF Dept. of Building Inspection

DBI inspectors say their boss kept them off connected builders’ projects

Most Read