New CBO figures show some premiums would go up

Some health insurance premiums would rise by as much as 13 percent if a Senate health care reform bill is enacted into law, the Congressional Budget Office reports Monday.

In a letter responding to a query by Sen. Evan Bayh (D-Ind.) the CBO found that people who purchase insurance in 2016 outside of group plans would be paying about $5,800 for single policies and $15,200 for family policies compared with $5,500 for single policies and $13,100 for family policies under current law.

Of those who would be subjected to higher premiums, 57 percent would receive government subsidies called for in the Senate bill, which would actually lower their premiums substantially.

But the remaining 43 percent would be stuck paying more for insurance.

The CBO analyzed the impact of the Senate bill on group policies as well and found there would be little to no difference in the price of insurance premiums.

It also determined that 19 percent of insurance policy holders would be subjected to a proposed excise tax on luxury plans, and that the tax would be passed on to consumers. But according to CBO, most people would end up dropping the high-end coverage for cheaper policies not subject to the tax.

And the CBO found that all premiums would increase slighly thanks to proposed fees on the insurance companies and manufacturers of medical devices.

“Both of those fees would be largely passed throughto consumers in the form of higher premiums for private coverage,” the CBO letter says.

Beltway ConfidentialObamacareSenateUS

Just Posted

Dominion Voting Systems, a Denver-based vendor, is under contract to supply voting machines for elections in San Francisco. (Kevin N. Hume/Examiner file)
Is San Francisco’s elections director impeding voting machine progress?

Open source technology could break up existing monopoly

The 49ers take on the Packers in Week 3 of the NFL season, before heading into a tough stretch of divisional opponents. (Courtesy San Francisco 49ers)
‘Good for Ball’ or ‘Bad for Ball’ — A Niners analysis

By Mychael Urban Special to The Examiner What’s the first thing that… Continue reading

Health experts praised Salesforce for keeping its Dreamforce conference at Moscone Center outdoors and on a small scale. (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)
Happy birthday, Marc Benioff. Your company did the right thing

Salesforce kept Dreamforce small, which made all kinds of sense

Former San Francisco Mayor Willie Brown, pictured with Rose Pak in 2014, says the late Chinatown activist was “helping to guide the community away from the divisions, politically.”
Willie and Rose: How an alliance for the ages shaped SF

How the Mayor and Chinatown activist shaped San Francisco, then and now

The Grove in Golden Gate Park is maintained largely by those who remember San Francisco’s 20,000 AIDS victims.<ins> (Open Eye Pictures/New York Times)</ins>
Looking at COVID through the SF prism of AIDS

AIDS took 40 years to claim 700,000 lives. COVID surpassed that number in 21 months

Most Read