National “Coffee Party” convention is total failure

Remember the “Coffee Party?” Supposedly, it was a grassroots group started to counter Tea Party influence. But after it received lots of national media attention, it was revealed to have been started by a former New York Times employee and Democratic activists. Well, apparently the “Coffee Party” had its first national convention and it proved to be a total bust, but strangely enough, they’re still being taken seriously by the media:

The Coffee Party USA — which was founded on Facebook and is holding its first national convention in Louisville this weekend — bills itself as a more thoughtful and reasoned alternative to the tea party.

Saturday night the organization held a panel discussion, part of its three-day “Restoring American Democracy” convention, that included bloggers, college professors and communications strategists talking about what they can do to make politics more inclusive. They also discussed how to draw more disenfranchised voters back into the democratic process.

The discussion before about 350 people at the Galt House touched on policy, politics and values and how to bridge the partisan divide.

Whoa, 350 people for a national convention! Cup of Joementum! Please, please let’s make sure we set aside lots more column inches devoted to covering this important grassroots phenomenon that’s clearly having a big electoral impact.</p>

(h/t to Gateway Pundit)

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