Michelle Obama not most admired woman — even among Democrats

Gallup has released its annual poll on the most admired man and woman in the United States. In the most admired woman category, Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton is the winner, named by 16 percent of respondents. Former Republican vice presidential candidate Sarah Palin is a close second, with 15 percent. Talk show host Oprah Winfrey is third, with eight percent, and First Lady Michelle Obama is fourth, named by seven percent.

Gallup says Mrs. Clinton has been named most admired woman 14 times since 1993, when she first became First Lady. Her run stretched into the Bush years, as well, but in 2001, President George W. Bush's first year in office, First Lady Laura Bush was Gallup's most admired woman.

Looking further into Mrs. Obama's rating, the current First Lady is not the most admired woman among respondents of any political party. Among Democrats, Mrs. Obama placed second to Clinton. Among independents, she placed fourth, behind Palin, Clinton, and Winfrey. And among Republicans, she placed fifth, behind Palin, Clinton, Winfrey, and former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice. (By the way, while a number of Republicans say they admire Mrs. Clinton, no Democrats say they admire Palin.)

In the most admired man category, President Obama is the runaway winner, named by 30 percent of those surveyed. Former President George W. Bush is in second place, although far behind with four percent. Former South African President Nelson Mandela is in third place, with three percent, and Fox News' Glenn Beck is tied for fourth with two percent — a position shared with Pope Benedict XVI, the Rev. Billy Graham, and Microsoft founder Bill Gates.

Broken out by political party, Democrats and independents most admire Obama, while Republicans name Bush as their most admired. Among Democrats, Mandela is second, followed by former President Bill Clinton, Gates, golfer Tiger Woods and former basketball star Michael Jordan. (The poll was taken in mid-December, when Woods' troubles were well known.) Among independents, other admired men are Beck, Bush, Gates, Mandela, and the pope. Among Republicans, it's a similar list, minus Mandela and Gates and plus Graham and Sen. John McCain.

Beltway ConfidentialGallupHillary ClintonUS

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