Manchin lies about his position on Obamacare

The NRSC is highlighting West Virginia governor Joe Manchin’s recent claim to West Virginia Gazette reporter Alison Knezevich that he wouldn’t have voted for Obamacare:

“I wouldn’t have voted for the final version of that thing with the way that it came out.”

The NRSC points out a YouTube clip of Manchin saying he was “totally behind health care reform.” But that was from September 2009. Manchin, now the Democratic candidate for Robert Byrd’s vacant Senate seat, could have easily changed his mind between then and the vote on the “final version” of “that thing” in March 2010. But he didn’t:

During a March 15, 2010 panel on health care at the National Governors Association in Washington, Manchin said that he would vote for the health care bill if he were a congressman. The panel’s moderator, journalist Karen Tumulty, asked Manchin and other governors on the panel, “If you were a House member … and you’ve got your choice: vote up on the Senate bill or vote down on the Senate bill, how do you vote?”

“I’d be for it,” Manchin replied. “You have to move this ball forward. … I have never, since I’ve been in the legislative process, and since I have been governor, I have never got a perfect bill.”

Watch the video here.

Someone needs to ask Manchin what changed between March 15, 2010 when he said he would vote for Obamacare and March 21, 2010 when the “final version” of the bill was voted on. And why is it that two weeks after the “final version” passed did the governor’s spokesman say Manchin supported the bill?

As the West Virginia State Journal reported on on April 1, 2010: “Matt Turner, spokesman for Gov. Joe Manchin, said the governor supported the legislation.”

Read more at The Weekly Standard.

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