Liftoff: 1st US shipment in months flying to space station

In this image released by NASA, an unmanned Atlas V rocket rolls out of the vertical integration facility to the launch pad, Wednesday, Dec. 2, 2015, at Cape Canaveral, Fla. The rocket due to lift off early Thursday evening with 7,400 pounds of supplies for the International Space Station. (Aubrey Gemignani/NASA via AP)

In this image released by NASA, an unmanned Atlas V rocket rolls out of the vertical integration facility to the launch pad, Wednesday, Dec. 2, 2015, at Cape Canaveral, Fla. The rocket due to lift off early Thursday evening with 7,400 pounds of supplies for the International Space Station. (Aubrey Gemignani/NASA via AP)

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — A U.S. shipment of much-needed groceries and other astronaut supplies rocketed toward the International Space Station for the first time in months Sunday, reigniting NASA’s commercial delivery service.

If the Orbital ATK capsule arrives at the space station Wednesday as planned, it will represent the first U.S. delivery since spring.

To NASA’s relief, the weather cooperated after three days of high wind and cloudy skies that kept the Atlas V rocket firmly on the ground. Everything came together on the fourth launch attempt, allowing the unmanned Atlas to blast off in late afternoon with 7,400 pounds of space station cargo, not to mention some Christmas presents for the awaiting crew.

Tony Bruno, president of rocket maker United Launch Alliance urged, “Everyone cross your fingers and think happy weather thoughts.”

It apparently worked.

The rocket sored safely through clouds, as the space station sped over the Atlantic, north Bermuda.

Launch controllers applauded, shook hands and hugged one another once the Cygnus cargo carrier reached the proper orbit 21 minutes after liftoff.

“This is about as good as it gets,” said Vernon Thorp, a United Launch Alliance manager.

The space station astronauts got to see some of the rocket contrails.

“Caught something good on the horizon,” Space Station Commander Scott Kelly reported via Twitter.

The six station astronauts — two of them deep into a one-year mission — have gone without American shipments since April. Two private companies contracted for more than $3.5 billion by NASA to replenish the 250-mile-high lab are stuck on Earth with grounded rockets. Orbital ATK bought another company’s rocket, the veteran Atlas V, for this supply mission.

Orbital’s previous grocery run, its fourth, ended in a fiery explosion seconds after liftoff in October 2014. SpaceX, the other supplier, suffered a launch failure in June on its eighth trip.

Russia also lost a supply ship earlier this year. But it’s since picked up the slack, with another resupply mission scheduled just before Christmas, and Japan has chipped in as well.

Much-needed food is inside Orbital’s cargo carrier, named Cygnus after the swan constellation. NASA normally likes to have a six-month stash of food aboard the space station, but it’s down a couple months because of the three failed flights. Space station program manager Kirk Shireman expects it will take another year to get the pantry full again — provided there are no more accidents.

Also aboard the newest Cygnus capsule: clothes, toiletries, spacewalking gear, air-supply tanks and science experiments.

This is the first time that the United Launch Alliance’s Atlas V has served the space station. Normally used for hefty satellite launches, it is the mighty successor to the Atlas used to put John Glenn into orbit in 1962. Boeing intends to use the Atlas V to boost the Starliner capsules it’s building to ferry astronauts to the space station beginning in 2017.

Orbital plans to use another Atlas rocket for a supply run in March, then return its own Antares rocket to flight from Virginia in May.

SpaceX — also part of NASA’s commercial crew effort — aims to restart station deliveries in January with its Falcon rockets.

While acknowledging 2015 has been a difficult year because of the disrupted supply chain, Shireman said commercial space is inevitable and will drive down launch costs. NASA’s 30-year shuttle program proved expensive and complicated, and, on two flights, deadly.

“It is our future,” Shireman stressed at a news conference last week.

The Cygnus launched Sunday is named after Mercury 7 astronaut Deke Slayton, a pioneer in commercial spaceflight before his death in 1993.

US

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

Many famillies have supported keeping John F. Kennedy Drive in Golden Gate Park free of car traffic. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Fight over future of JFK Drive heats up

Shamann Walton compares accessibilty issues to segregation, likens street closure to ‘1950s South’

Tara Hobson, center, principal at SF International High School, welcomes a student back on Monday, April 26, 2021. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
SFUSD seniors get a chance to say goodbye to school in person

Deal to briefly return older students to school leaves many parents and teens dissatisfied

(Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
City College union deal staves off layoffs, class cuts

One year agreement allows community college time to improve its finances

San Francisco Giants pitcher Logan Webb (62) faced down the Rangers Tuesday in a two-game sweep by the giants. (Photography by Chris Victorio | Special to the S.F. Examiner).
Webb posts career-high 10 strikeouts as Giants finish sweep of Rangers

The Texas Rangers arrived in San Francisco with one of the hottest… Continue reading

A Homeless Outreach Team member speaks with homeless people along Jones Street in the Tenderloin on Wednesday, May 6, 2020. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Breed proposes another street outreach team to divert calls away from police

San Francisco would launch a new street outreach team to respond to… Continue reading

Most Read