Judge rejects Trump’s request to preserve records in Nevada

WASHINGTON — Things did not go great for Donald Trump’s campaign in a Nevada court Tuesday.

District Judge Gloria Sturman was unimpressed by the lawsuit it filed alleging improprieties in early voting around Las Vegas. She rejected the campaign’s request to preserve particular records — saying county officials were already required by law to preserve most of them. And then she excoriated Trump’s attorneys for seeking the names of paid and volunteer poll workers.

The judge suggested that ordering their identities be made public would subject them to any manner of abuse from Trump’s notoriously aggressive supporters online.

“Do you watch Twitter?” Sturman said. “Have you watched any cable news shows? There are internet — you know the vernacular — trolls who could get this information and harass people. Why would I order them to make available to you information about people who work at polls?”

Sturman also chastised the campaign for taking up the time of the defendant, Clark County Registrar of Voters Joe Gloria, when he was busy with Election Day. And she questioned what the Trump campaign was even doing in court when it had not yet issued its grievances with the secretary of state, an administrative step she said should have been taken before a hearing was scheduled.

“I am not going to issue any order,” Sturman said. “I am not going to do that.”

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