'Internet ID?' No thanks, say online privacy advocates

Lost in all the press about the disturbing events this weekend in Arizona is the fact that Obama wants to creative an “internet ID.” He plans on using the Department of Commerce for this effort. Needless to say libertarians, technology and privacy advocates are not impressed.

CNET reports on this next step in the government take-over of the internet.  The words of the White House person in charge of such things will send chills down the spine of many.

“It's “the absolute perfect spot in the U.S. government” to centralize efforts toward creating an “identity ecosystem” for the Internet, White House Cybersecurity Coordinator Howard Schmidt said.

Fox reports that the CD&T spokesman is wary of such a move. He like many others do not seem at all calmed by government assurances it will be “centralized database.”

“The government cannot create that identity infrastructure,” Jim Dempsey of the Center for Democracy and Technology told the website. “If I tried to, I wouldn't be trusted.”

Schmidt said there will be no database, CBS News reports.

“Schmidt stressed today that anonymity and pseudonymity will remain possible on the Internet. “I don't have to get a credential if I don't want to,” he said. There's no chance that “a centralized database will emerge,” and “we need the private sector to lead the implementation of this,” he said.”

Engadget does not seem to believe with Gary Locke of the Commerce Department in his assurances about the nature of this ID.

“Sorry, Locke, sounds like a national ID system to us. Anyway, the Obama administration is currently drafting what it's dubbed the National Strategy for Trusted Identities in Cyberspace, which is expected at the Department of Commerce in a few months.

The internet and your online freedoms seem to be under constant assault by the Obama administration. This is merely the latest shot across the laissez faire internet’s bow.  

Beltway ConfidentialIDinternetUS

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