Hundreds dead after monsoon causes landslides, floods across South Asia

New Delhi — More than 1,700 people have died in catastrophic floods in India, Nepal, Bangladesh and Pakistan as torrential rains pound swaths of South Asia during its worst monsoon season in more than a decade.

According to the United Nations, at least 41 million people in Bangladesh, India and Nepal have been directly affected by flooding and landslides from the monsoon rains that began in June and continue until October.

In India alone, more than 1,300 people, mostly the poor in villages, have died since the beginning of the rainy season, estimates from state disaster management agencies and reports showed.

The eastern Indian state of Bihar is the worst-affected with more than 500 deaths, as major rivers in spate caused large-scale inundation affecting hundreds of villages across 21 districts.

The country’s financial capital of Mumbai was lashed by heavy rains on Tuesday that claimed more than 30 lives, including several from a building collapse on Thursday that officials said was caused by the intense downpour.

In neighbouring Pakistan, heavy rains caused a massive deluge in the port city of Karachi on Thursday, killing at least a dozen people. The overall death toll for the season stood at more than 100, the National Disaster Management Authority said.

Nepal was also experiencing heavy floods, which have claimed 159 lives so far, authorities said. The country’s eastern hills and plains along the border with India were severely affected.

In Bangladesh, 141 people have died after floodwaters from upstream rivers from Indian hills swelled Bangladeshi river systems.

“This is the worst flooding that parts of South Asia have seen in decades,” Jagan Chapagain, under secretary general for programmes and operations at the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies, said last week.

New Delhi — More than 1,700 people have died in catastrophic floods in India, Nepal, Bangladesh and Pakistan as torrential rains pound swaths of South Asia during its worst monsoon season in more than a decade.

According to the United Nations, at least 41 million people in Bangladesh, India and Nepal have been directly affected by flooding and landslides from the monsoon rains that began in June and continue until October.

In India alone, more than 1,300 people, mostly the poor in villages, have died since the beginning of the rainy season, estimates from state disaster management agencies and reports showed.

The eastern Indian state of Bihar is the worst-affected with more than 500 deaths, as major rivers in spate caused large-scale inundation affecting hundreds of villages across 21 districts.

The country’s financial capital of Mumbai was lashed by heavy rains on Tuesday that claimed more than 30 lives, including several from a building collapse on Thursday that officials said was caused by the intense downpour.

In neighbouring Pakistan, heavy rains caused a massive deluge in the port city of Karachi on Thursday, killing at least a dozen people. The overall death toll for the season stood at more than 100, the National Disaster Management Authority said.

Nepal was also experiencing heavy floods, which have claimed 159 lives so far, authorities said. The country’s eastern hills and plains along the border with India were severely affected.

In Bangladesh, 141 people have died after floodwaters from upstream rivers from Indian hills swelled Bangladeshi river systems.

“This is the worst flooding that parts of South Asia have seen in decades,” Jagan Chapagain, under secretary general for programmes and operations at the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies, said last week.

World

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