How to deal with sugary Halloween leftovers

Q. My husband and I weren’t visited by many greedy goblins this Halloween. Now there’s a huge stash of leftover candy tempting us.

Most of it’s just sugar, so is it really that bad? We’re great brushers!

— Anonymous, via email

A. Nah, there’s nothing wrong with sugar, as long as you don’t mind your arteries clogging, your cancer risks rising and your skin aging faster than iPhones sell.

How come? We’ll keep this short, if not sweet:

1. When you eat more sugar than your body can burn, it messes up your proteins — for instance, it stops one from delivering oxygen to your tissues. Then your liver repackages excess sugar into fat and dumps it into your bloodstream, where it clogs up your arteries.

2. There’s growing evidence that frequent, large doses of sugar are toxic to certain cells, causing damage that leads to cancer. One example: People who eat a sugar-heavy diet are 70 percent more likely to develop deadly pancreatic cancer than those who shun the sweet stuff.

3. Too many sweets accelerate skin aging because sugar is attracted to collagen proteins. Normally, collagen keeps skin elastic, supple and well-supported. But when collagen hooks up with sugar, it can’t do its job properly. Your face ends up looking a bit like a pumpkin.

Sour effects

If you eat more sugar than your body can burn:

  • Interferes with protein absorption
  • Blocks oxygen from your tissues
  • Converts to blood fat in your liver
  • Large doses are toxic to some cells
  • Sugar-heavy diet can promote cancers
  • Speeds skin aging

The YOU Docs — Mehmet Oz, host of “The Dr. Oz Show,” and Mike Roizen of Cleveland Clinic — are the authors of “YOU: Losing Weight.” For more information go to www.RealAge.com.

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