How to cut off Obamacare

Litigation over Obamacare’s individual mandate has captured the public’s attention. But the ultimate goal in challenging the constitutionality of President Barack Obama’s health care law is not the mandate, it is
severability.

This individual mandate that you must buy health insurance is the most obnoxious provision of Obamacare, eradicating the concept of limited government. If the federal government can tell you how to spend your own money to buy insurance, then it also has the power to command how you spend the rest of your money in every area of life.

But the mandate is only one intolerable aspect of Obamacare. One authoritarian provision is the employer mandate, imposing draconian penalties on every employer with more than 50 workers who does not offer health insurance. Obamacare includes many such mandates, taxes and administrative burdens.

And it funds abortion, notwithstanding Obama’s executive order to the contrary. (Presidents cannot attach conditions on funding that Congress approves for general use.) Other provisions drive up premiums, such as requiring insurance policies to cover children until they reach their mid-20s.

Many of these provisions are policy choices within Congress’ purview and cannot successfully be challenged in court.

There is one way to nullify all of these provisions, however. Obamacare lacks a severability clause, which states that if any part of the statute is found invalid, then the remainder continues in full force and effect.

Severability provisions are so common as to be boilerplate. (If you look at a contract around your home, you’re likely to find such a clause toward the end of the document.) 

A court always applies a presumption of implied severability. Under severability doctrine, a court will surgically excise an unconstitutional provision from a law if possible. However, if the court finds the invalid provision an essential part of the legislation, then the court can strike down the entire statute.

The presumption that Congress intended severability is weakened in the absence of a severability clause, as is the case with Obamacare.

Thus, if a court finds the individual mandate unconstitutional, and that the mandate goes to the core of the legislative deal, then the entire 2,700-page law can be struck down with a single court decision.

All three major lawsuits challenging Obamacare argue that the individual mandate cannot be severed from the remainder of the statute. Although this issue rarely arises, U.S. Supreme Court precedent weighs in favor of holding that the mandate cannot be severed from the statute.

The documentary “I Want Your Money” quotes House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s infamous Obamacare comment that “we have to pass the bill so that you can find out what is in it.” Well, Madam Speaker, a severability clause is one thing not in the bill — and that may prove to be its undoing.

Striking down the Obamacare individual mandate would be a historic vindication of the rule of law. But if the courts find that the mandate is not severable from the remainder of the statute, then it could wipe clean the slate of health care reform.

That would return this issue to a new Congress — and possibly a new president — to devise reform legislation that will actually improve health care costs instead of an unprecedented invasion into the lives and liberties of American citizens.

Ken Blackwell is a senior fellow at the Family Research Council and a visiting professor at Liberty University School of Law. Ken Klukowski is the special counsel at the Family Research Council and a research fellow with Liberty University School of Law. They are authors of “The Blueprint: Obama’s Plan to Subvert the Constitution and Build an Imperial Presidency.”

Op EdsOpinionSan FranciscoUS

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

Many famillies have supported keeping John F. Kennedy Drive in Golden Gate Park free of car traffic. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Fight over future of JFK Drive heats up

Shamann Walton compares accessibilty issues to segregation, likens street closure to ‘1950s South’

Tara Hobson, center, principal at SF International High School, welcomes a student back on Monday, April 26, 2021. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
SFUSD seniors get a chance to say goodbye to school in person

Deal to briefly return older students to school leaves many parents and teens dissatisfied

(Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
City College union deal staves off layoffs, class cuts

One year agreement allows community college time to improve its finances

San Francisco Giants pitcher Logan Webb (62) faced down the Rangers Tuesday in a two-game sweep by the giants. (Photography by Chris Victorio | Special to the S.F. Examiner).
Webb posts career-high 10 strikeouts as Giants finish sweep of Rangers

The Texas Rangers arrived in San Francisco with one of the hottest… Continue reading

A Homeless Outreach Team member speaks with homeless people along Jones Street in the Tenderloin on Wednesday, May 6, 2020. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Breed proposes another street outreach team to divert calls away from police

San Francisco would launch a new street outreach team to respond to… Continue reading

Most Read