How to balance the budget by 2016 without cutting spending below current levels

Washington politicians are likely to peddling two major myths in coming months to explain why the federal budget can't be balanced without either hiking taxes or cutting “essential services” to the bone, kicking Grandpa and Grandma on Social Security to the curb, and throwing welfare mothers and kids on the sidewalk.

Not true. Not even close. The truth is Washington's professional politicians in both political parties, career civil service bureaucrats, liberal non-protit activists and think tanks, and armies of consultants and other contractors to Big Government have a vested interest in seeing federal spending constantly increase.

That's why they say we must either raise taxes to close the deficit, or cut government programs that nobody allegedly wants to be without.

Dan Mitchell of the Cato Institute exposes these two myths as utter falsehoods and in the process shows exactly how to balance the federal budget by 2016 without having to endure spending cuts below current levels. Sound too good to be true? Usually, that means it is but check out Mitchell's video below and you will see the data is right there for all to see.

 

Beltway ConfidentialCongressOpinionUS

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