Hot Property: Gracious ’20s home made to entertain

1927 was a good year for Oscar Henry Fisher. In 1916, the shipyard worker had scraped together enough money to buy the venerable H.M. Montague stoveworks company at 1999 Third St. Since then, World War I and several public-works projects — including the building of the Hetch Hetchy dam — had made Fisher a very successful man.

It was time to build a home that reflected his success.

For this home, Fisher and his family chose a 6,000-square-foot lot in the hills above Monterey Avenue. There, they built a grand, 2,810-square-foot Spanish-Mediterranean home with four bedrooms (including a maid’s room downstairs), three bathrooms, a barrel-ceilinged living room, and a raised conservatory that would eventually house a grand piano.

Downstairs, they built a large “social room,” with a wet bar tucked away behind swinging western doors. After all, in 1927, the repeal of the 18th Amendment — national prohibition — was still six years away. Better to hide the bar behind some swinging doors.

In 1940, Oscar and his wife, Lilly, turned the house over to their daughter-in-law, Mildred Fisher. She stayed there for the rest of her life.

Mildred recently passed away at 92. All of her heirs live out of the area, so they’ve decided to sell the family home. Oscar Fisher’s symbol of success is on the open market for the first time in its 80-year history.

To walk through 287 Brentwood Ave. is to be swept into a time before Viking ranges and HD televisions.

“People would go downstairs to drink their cocktails and dance,” says listing agent Andrew Herrera II, of Prudential. “Or they would entertain upstairs, in the living room, with the piano.”

“It’s a truly gracious floorplan,” he says.

“They used it as sort of a family compound,” Herrera says. “They have had all of their holiday gatherings here since the beginning of time.”

Time passes, and there will no longer be any Fishers on Brentwood Avenue. But, as Herrera points out, “It’s time for the second family to ever own the house to step up to the plate.”

Where: San Francisco

Asking Price: $1,565,000

Property Tax: $20,345*

The Property: Custom-built 1927 Mediterranean home with 2,810 square feet, 4 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, downstairs “social room,” maid’s quarters, conservatory and 6,000-square-foot lot.

Notable: Has been in the same family since 1927; trust sale is first time home has been on the market; beautifully preserved original details and large, horizontal layout.

Agent: Andrew Herrera II, Prudential California Franciscan Properties, (415) 664-9175, ext. 777.

*Estimate based on 1.3% of asking price.

lrosen@examiner.com  

Other hot properties

Where: San Francisco

Asking Price: $1,688,000

Property Tax: $21,944*

The Property: Large (2,700 square feet) single-family Inner Richmond home with 4 bedrooms and 3½ bathrooms, plus family room, den and bonus room.

Notable: Beautifully preserved wood trim and details throughout; remodeled kitchen with professional-grade appliances; large downstairs bonus room; one block from Golden Gate Park.

Agent: Conrad Z. Perreras, Century 21 Achievers, (650) 991-2400, ext. 188.


Where: Atherton

Asking Price: $1,995,000

Property Tax: $25,935*

The Property: New construction in Atherton with 4 bedrooms (plus office) and 4 bathrooms, a 6,550-square-foot, level lot, 2,580 square feet total.

Notable: Home is in Menlo Park school district; kitchen features top-of-the-line appliances; new home.

Agents: Keri Nicholas, Coldwell Banker-Menlo Park Santa Cruz, (650) 329-6654. www.kerinicholas.com

Vacation home

Where: Nevada City

Asking Price: $1,595,000

Property Tax: $20,735*

The Property: 1860 Queen Anne mansion with 7 bedrooms and 7½ bathrooms, currently being used as the Deer Creek Inn Bed & Breakfast. 4,237square feet on 1 acre.

Notable: Voted “Best Bed & Breakfast” by Union readers in 2006. Creek frontage.

Agents: Mini Simmons, ERA Cornerstone Realty Group, (530) 265-7940.

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