Hot Property: An early vision of The City

Henry Doelger and the Gellert brothers were not the only visionaries eager to transform the sand dunes of the Sunset into real-estate gold.

Long before either started buying up land west of Twin Peaks, big-time San Francisco developer Fernando Nelson tried his luck with a plot of land just south of Golden Gate Park, in what is now the central Sunset.

By 1916, Nelson had already made his name as the father of the Richmond. With his Parkway Terrace project, Nelson sought to build large, detached homes on oversized city lots — reminiscent of the large summer homes on East Coast beaches, lakes and mountains.

Before he could complete the project, however, he discovered a larger plot of land available in what would become West Portal. Parkway Terrace, then, ended after just a few blocks.

According to listing agent Cameron Ezadjoo of Coldwell Banker, 2645 Lincoln Way was one of the first homes built in Parkway Terrace.

“[Nelson] was living across the street, and they built this,” he says.

The 4,000-plus square-foot stucco mansion is on the market now, after being in the same family for more than 50 years.

“It’s a very unique property,” Ezadjoo says.

This is probably an understatement. In a Victorian and Edwardian city of 25-foot wide lots, 2645 Lincoln Way sits like a faded castle on the corner of 28th Avenue and Lincoln. It is empty, its rooms free to house whatever ghosts have accumulated in the past 90 years.

The original details — molding, wood paneling, are intact. The kitchen and 3½ bathrooms are functional but long past their most recent remodel, adding to the home’s mystique as a kind of period piece preserved in amber.

No, you are not getting a Sub-Zero refrigerator and a home-theater system. What you are getting is Fernando Nelson’s vision of the “city in the country,” and a whiff of grand San Francisco living, circa 1917.

Where: San Francisco

Asking Price: $3,000,000

Property Tax: $39,000*

The Property: 1917 Parkway Terrace home with four bedrooms, 3½ bathrooms and 4,000+ square feet of living space; period details throughout; in-law on first floor; corner lot overlooking Golden Gate Park.

Notable: Unique, chalet-style mansion built by noted San Francisco developer Fernando Nelson as an early example of his vision for the edges of The City.

Agents: Cameron Ezadjoo, Coldwell Banker Greenbrae, (415) 717-4649.

*Estimate based on 1.3% of asking price.

lrosen@examiner.com

businessBusiness & Real Estate

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