Hot property: $1.9M neighborhood cornerstone

The house at 335 Virginia Ave. in San Mateo was built 80 years ago, around the same time that San Mateo High School moved to its present location on Delaware Street, and when all of San Mateo County had approximately 65,000 residents.

Built on a hillside by a view-loving former Kentuckian, according to Alain Pinel Real Estate agent Maryellen Curtis, the colonial Georgian-style house was one of the early buildings in the Baywood neighborhood. Over the years, other homes were built around it, but it still has its Bay views and the neighborhood has retained a certain traditional style.

The Virginia Avenue house has a number of such features, including three sets of French doors that open onto a patio, two roof terraces, and a red brick exterior with window boxes and shutters.

Inside, it has panel walls, crown moldings, barley-twist newels on the foyer staircase and original brass hardware. A breakfast room has crenellated crown moldings and a built-in hutch, according to Curtis.

The house, when it was built in 1927, would have been one of the first to be built on a 375,000-acre parcel of the old Parrott estate, which was subdivided in that year through the efforts of Dr. D.A. Raybould, a premier real estate agent of the time, San Mateo County History Museum Director Mitch Postel said. That land division created the Baywood neighborhood, he said.

The year 1927 also marked the construction of the Benjamin Franklin Hotel, now a San Mateo landmark, and the one-year anniversaries of both the San Mateo Rotary Club and the San Mateo Theater on Third Street.

There are some newer features to 335 Virginia Ave; the kitchen has been updated and the family room remodeled, according to Curtis. It was last bought in 2002 for $1.5 million, county records indicate.

Where: San Mateo
Asking price: $1,995,000
Property tax: $25,935*
What: 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, 2,556 square feet
Amenities: Baywood neighborhood, two-car garage, fireplace, hardwood floors, high ceilings.
Agent: Maryellen Curtis, Alain Pinel Realtors, www.maryellencurtis.com, (650) 931-2844

*Estimate based on 1.3% of asking price.

kwilliamson@examiner.com

businessBusiness & Real Estate

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