Home restored to original splendor

This home almost met its doom in the early 1980s when it was purchased by developers who intended to convert it to condominiums or demolish it to build multiple dwelling units. Fortunately the surrounding neighborhood intervened with protests and the home wassaved.

This Buena Vista home was built in 1923 by the owners of the Flower Blossom Bakery on Haight Street. They wanted a home that was suitable for entertaining without being overly ostentatious, so they hired John H. Powers and John H. Ahnden. The residence was designed to encompass three parcels of land. At the time, most new homes cost approximately $6,000. According to city records, this home was completed for $18,125.

After the home was saved from demolition in the ’80s it sat vacant until 1995 when the current owners bought it with the intent to restore it to its original splendor. They wanted to emphasize its inherent Italian character and increase the living space by 25 percent. They commissioned architect Carolynn Abst for the job.

“The renovation reflects the fusion of modern technology and historic charm,” said listing agent Harry Clark with Zephyr Real Estate. “A talented team of designers worked to create a thoughtful and authentic renovation, uncommonly found anywhere in The City. This property represents the type of real estate any experienced agent would be honored to represent.”

The home has been on the market since March but Zephyr President Bill Drypolcher said he believes there is still a strong market for homes in the $4 million and $5 million range.

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