Hoffman|Lewis for NorCal Toyota dealers

Each week, The Examiner showcases an advertising campaign by a local company.

Client: Northern California Toyota Dealers Association

Job: Three TV commercials that promote the attributes of the new Toyota Tundra truck

Agency: Hoffman|Lewis, San Francisco/St. Louis

Principals: Bob Hoffman, CEO and founder; Sharon Krinsky, president

Other clients: VSP, McDonald’s, Bank of the West, BevMo

Creative team: Guy Bommarito, creative director, copy writer; James Cabral, art director; Barbary Coast, editorial; Dave Januska, music.

The plan: The campaign airs in Northern California during sports, prime-time and news programs with strong male demographics

The theme: “Tundra, the Truck that’s Changing It All.”

The concept: The “Tattoo” campaign is set in a neon-lit tattoo parlor where a man changes his tattoo from Ford to Tundra as he gazes out the window at his truck. The “Belt Buckle” campaign focuses on a man changing his buckle from Chevy to Tundra to the country song refrain “Now I’ve found somebody new.”

Guy Bommarito

Position: Senior vice president and creative director

Education: Graduated from the University of Texas at Austin with a degree in advertising

Background: Executive creative director at GSD&M in Austin; taught at the University of Texas at Austin; executive group creative director at Foote, Cone, Belding in Chicago.

What drove your development of the concept? Since truck buyers often view their pickups as an extension of themselves, it’s just as important to address that aspect of the truck as it is to talk about the vehicle’s nuts and bolts. The idea for the spots was born out of a conversation with a Ford F-150 owner who, after test-driving a new Tundra, remarked, “Great truck. Just one problem. If I buy it, what do I do with this Ford tattoo on my shoulder?”

What are you working on next: Agency holiday card.

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