HHS Secretary – we will ‘reeducate’ you on ObamaCare

In an interview on Monday, the HHS Secretary Katherine Sebelious lamented, “Unfortunately, there still is a great deal of confusion about what is in [the reform law] and what isn’t.” She insisted that when the people learned what they would get from the new law, they’d more warmly embrace it. “We have a lot of reeducation to do”, she said.

Reeducation? Really? Does anyone else find it ironic that the word choice was such a loaded one like reeducation?

One of the examples she used to point out that reform is a plus is the fact that over 1 million seniors received a check this month to fill the “donut hole” in the Medicare Part D program. However much seniors may appreciate the extra $250, it is clear that the money doesn’t at all represent the totality of ObamaCare’s changes. And it certainly wasn’t necessary to pass the rest of the “reform” law to fill that donut hole.

These headlines, however, better represent the changes wrought by ObamaCare:

Hospital Association Says State Will Lose Under Health Care Reform, Staff Report, The Lexington [KY] Herald-Leader

Maine Seeks Health Care Waiver, Avery Johnson, The Wall Street Journal

Medicaid Expansion To Cost Ohio $1.45 Billion, Catherine Cadinsky, The Columbus Dispatch

Research into its impact is coming out daily:

ObamaCare: Impact On States, Edmund Haislmaier and Brian Blase, The Heritage Foundation

And its effect on existing programs, programs that are working, is destructive:

Lost Opportunity, Paul Howard, City Journal

Never mind the fact that it was figuratively rammed down the throats of a public that made it clear they weren’t interested in the type “reform” Democrats were trying to sell:

Partnership, ObamaCare-Style: Jump, or Be Pushed, Michael Cannon, Cato@Liberty

It is interesting now, given the above cites, that the administration via the HHS Secretary sees a need to “reeducate” us. Apparently there is a desire to placate the teeming masses who’ve made it clear they find the government’s usurpation of power by taking over health care to be a net bad move. The strategy is to claim that all this uproar is much ado about nothing and we should be fine with the drastic and less than acceptable changes we’ll see in our future health care. So we’re in for reeducation.

As Ed Morrissey points out, the choice of that word says a lot:

“Re-education” has been a favorite effort by tyrannies over the past century or so, mainly (but not exclusively) communist.  The most notorious programs came in China, Cambodia, and Vietnam, the latter of which produced the mass exodus of “boat people” to the US and other countries. “Re-education” has come to mean either brainwashing or intimidation of political dissidents.

That’s the problem – the people just don’t get it and it is the function of government – at least that of  this one – to “reeducate” us so we understand and support the government line and learn to appreciate what they’ve done for us. It’s high time we get it through our heads that government always has the answers and that its answers are always what are best for it us.

It is no longer a government of the people, by the people and for the people. They know much better what we need and require. Consequently, it is now government for government and the people better learn to like it.

After all, that’s what “reeducation” is sure to teach us.

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