Group claims Congress hid medical data damaging to donors

A watchdog group has released a report that accuses Congress of helping medical research groups conceal information after key lawmakers received big campaign donations.

According to The Sunlight Foundation, Congress in 2007 voted to keep results from clinical trials for unapproved medical devices out of eyes of the public. The provision was inserted into Food and Drug Administration Amendment Act after lobbyists for medical research firms argued that making the results public would reveal proprietary information and potentially hurt business.

The FDA posts information regarding ongoing trials at ClinicalTrials.gov.

Using information compiled by the Center for Responsive Politics, Sunlight found that pharmaceutical and medical device political action committees and executives gave $3.4 million to members of the legislating committees in 2007.

Sunlight says the bill, at 422 pages, was available for only one hour for House members to review before they voted on it in September 2007, and nobody objected to a last-minute alteration to exclude studies of unapproved medical devises from having to publicly reveal their findings.

The provision keeping the medical trial information secret is hurting patients, according to Sunlight. The group sites Bray Patrick-Lake, a clinical trial volunteer who last year agreed to participate in a clinical trial of a medical device to close a hole in her heart. The clinical trial is now cancelled, and Patrick-Lake has no access to any of the results or what side effects could occur from her participation.

“At the behest of the pharmaceutical and medical lobby, Congress undermined the FDA's ability to provide the public with essential information about medical research for government-regulated trials on ClinicalTrials.gov,” said Nancy Watzman, who led the investigation for the Sunlight Foundation.

 

Beltway ConfidentialUS

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

The sidewalk on Egbert Avenue in the Bayview recently was cluttered with car parts, tires and other junk. <ins>(Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)</ins>
New surveillance effort aims to crack down on illegal dumping

’We want to make sure we catch people who are trashing our streets’

The recall election for California Gov. Gavin Newsom is scheduled for Sept. 14. (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)
SF could play a big role in overcoming Democrat apathy, driving voter turnout for Newsom

San Francisco voters are not used to swaying elections. Just think of… Continue reading

Health care workers treat a Covid-19 patient who needs to be intubated before being put on a ventilator at Providence St. Mary Medical Center during a surge of cases in Apple Valley, Dec. 17, 2020. Confronted with surging infections, California became the first state in the country to mandate coronavirus vaccines or testing for state employees and health-care workers. (Ariana Drehsler/The New York Times)
In California, a mix of support and resistance to new vaccine rules

By Shawn Hubler, Livia Albeck-Ripka and Soumya Karlamangla New York Times SACRAMENTO… Continue reading

Dave Hodges, pastor at Zide Door, the Church of Entheogenic Plants that include marijuana and psilocybin mushrooms, holds some psychedelic mushrooms inside the Oakland church on Friday, July 22, 2021. (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)
Psychedelic spirituality: Inside a growing Bay Area religious movement

‘They are guiding us into something ineffable’

Most Read