Greek columns, fireworks set for Obama's speech

It’s up to voters to decide whether Barack Obama will win the White House, but when he accepts the Democratic nomination at Invesco Field, it will look as if he’s already there.

Throughout the day Wednesday, Democrats and officials with the local host committee were scrambling to put together the venue for Obama’s acceptance speech at the home of the Denver Broncos.

A video taken by a crew member and posted online shows a plywood set that is built in faux-neoclassical grandeur with white columns. A long narrow walkway extends from the rear of the stage to a circular platform that will be surrounded by a sea of supporters when Obama is speaking.

After the speech, organizers plan to shower Obama with confetti loaded in cannons and launch a massive fireworks display from the top of the stadium, which is expected to hold more than 80,000.

Republicans mocked the stage design, referring to Obama’s hubris. The Obama camp countered by pointing out that the stage at the 2000 Republican convention where George W. Bush was nominated also included pillars, if not his own mini-Acropolis.

Obama’s speech will be delivered from near the 50-yard line of the stadium, with images beamed to the massive screens normally used for football replays.

Though only about a half-mile away from the Pepsi Center, the move to Invesco has proved challenging — and expensive. One crew member for a television network, who asked that his name not be used, said the additional cost of setting up its cameras and studios at the stadium would be close to $500,000.

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