FROM DC: Enhanced interrogation techniques worked

                On the Weekly Standard’s website Stephen Hayes draws the unavoidable conclusion from the report of and a subsequent interview with CIA Inspector General John Helgerson: the enhanced interrogation techniques, including but not limited to waterboarding, worked. They produced valuable intelligence that enabled U.S. authorities to prevent future attacks. The political left is trying to argue that we can’t really know whether this is so or not—that just because Khalid Sheikh Mohammed refused to give any significant information before being subjected to EITs and then did so after being subjected to those techniques, that EITs may not have been the reason for the change in his behavior. We are being asked to believe that perhaps it was a change in his metabolism, or something, that changed his behavior. Please. Wherever else the argument goes, those who oppose the use of EITs must concede that they did in fact produce valuable intelligence which we could have obtained in no other way. Case closed.

Beltway ConfidentialUS

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

Asian American youth report anger, sadness and fear over surge in racist behavior

Survey finds about 80 percent experienced bullying or verbal harassment

SFMTA cuts wellness program for Muni operators during pandemic

BackFirst provided preventative care for chronic disease plus help with diet, exercise and stress

California’s troubled unemployment agency needs immediate overhaul, report says

By Patrick McGreevy Los Angeles Times California’s antiquated unemployment benefits system requires… Continue reading

In Brown Type: New survey finds engagement and trend to progressivism among Asian American voters

The 2016 election and ‘Trump effect’ have fired up the voting bloc

Ruth Bader Ginsburg, liberal giant of the Supreme Court, dies

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who championed women’s rights — first as a… Continue reading

Most Read